Prancing Horse

Prancing Horse

3,600.00

Jan Desmarets

DETAILS

Bronze sculpture

Lost wax technique

Edition 12/24

4 x 10 x 10 in
10 x 24 x 26 cm

4 lbs - 2 Kg

Comes with a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist

This artwork ships in 10 to 14 days from Pittsburgh

This piece is final sale and not eligible for return

Biography

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Sometimes an artist comes along that is simply more.  A sculptor that is a paragon of force, dominating matter and bending it to reflect a global picture. They throw their rhythm into what they knead and model. Jan Desmarets of Belgium is one such artist. His work is striking – summed up : power in motion.

Jan Desmarets is a spirited man with his gigantic stature, exuberant personality and gregarious nature. Surrounded by people who appreciate and admire him, he is e

  • Bronze sculpture

  • Lost wax technique

  • Edition 14/24

  • 8.6" L x 5.5" W x 17.7" H (22 cm L x 14 cm W x 45 cm H)

  • 8.5 lbs - 3.8 kg

  • Comes with a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist

  • This artwork ships in 10 to 14 days from Pittsburgh

  • This piece is final sale and not eligible for return

xalted. He towers above them and yet creates a feeling of intimacy, of accessibility. A characteristic that bleeds into his art – his sculptures are authentic in their accessibility as they reflect a relationship with the everyday world. His prancing horses and dogs are sometimes stretched to look at their master, watching, waiting or they are crouched in playful attack, just ready to spring on their master who seems to move on his way lost in thought.

His work is monumental in all possible formats and thus particularly suitable for large public spaces. His art often takes up more space than the sum of its physical dimensions because it’s dynamic - like a flag blowing in the wind. It creates a sense of force in the space it occupies. The representation of reality is clearly not a goal in and of itself; instead he seeks to reflect movement, optimism and enthusiasm. 

-Translated from excerpts of the opening of "Kracht in Beweging" by Hugo Brutin